A UNIQUE LEADER

BY: Shri Thanedar, Candidate For State Rep

I was 14 years old when my father lost his job, causing my large family to fall into financial hardship. Like many Detroiters, I understand the pain of poverty firsthand. My family struggled to make ends meet, so I worked at night as a janitor while in high school, and we received help from public assistance programs. I continued to work my way through college, completing both a Bachelor and Master of Science Degrees in Chemistry. With these credentials, I was able to obtain a better job to lift up my family financially, paying for my sisters’ weddings and brother’s education. I later continued my education, earning a PhD in Chemistry from the University of Akron in Ohio, a Master of Business Administration from Fontbonne College in Missouri, and post-doctoral education at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. My education helped to set my career in motion. It was education that helped me overcome poverty, which is why I believe so strongly that we must greatly improve our children’s educational opportunities. It is imperative that we designate need-based funding for each child regardless of zip code to ensure that every child attains her or his full potential. Educational programs must start during early childhood. When education begins earlier, we know that outcomes improve. Even before kindergarten, young children have a tremendous capacity to absorb knowledge. We must develop pre-school programs to nurture their abilities. One of my priorities is to provide affordable childcare and pre-school education to every child. I am appalled when I learn about dismal conditions in some Detroit schools: forty or more students in a classroom; rain water on gymnasium floors; teachers paying for supplies from their own pockets; no art or music classes; no science or chemistry labs; teachers and students afraid for their safety; and kids wearing winter jackets in the classroom for lack of adequate heating. This is completely unacceptable. We must fix our failing school infrastructure, hire the support staff our teachers need, and pay teachers far better to foster opportunities in our communities. I am committed to increasing the staff of guidance counselors, social workers and psychologists in Detroit schools. These professionals help to identify students’ needs and provide essential services to help them succeed. In 2018, the Detroit Free Press reported, “In Michigan, on average, one counselor is assigned to as many as 732 students. That’s the third-
highest counselor-to-student ratio in the country.” Michigan is one of the 15 states without laws limiting class size, another fact I want to change.

I have had the privilege of creating job opportunities when I ran my small businesses and I hope to bring that spirit to Detroit. In 1990, I bought a three- person laboratory. By 2008, the business had grown under my leadership to 450 highly- paid employees, including 65 PhD chemists. My accomplishments were honored when I was named the Ernst and Young “Entrepreneur of the Year” in 1999 and again in 2007. As my business grew, I developed a passion for fostering entrepreneurship and small business ownership using micro-loans, business education, and business incubators — tools that have the power to revive communities that are neglected, underfunded, and struggling. I will use my experience to spur economic growth and innovation, and improve Detroit’s small businesses. While my business life thrived, my personal life did not. In 1996, when my sons were four and eight years old, they lost their mother to death related to mental illness. For four years, I struggled as a single, grieving father, until I was blessed to meet Shashi and marry this wonderful woman who helped raise the boys and heal our family. For many years, I experienced firsthand the suffering and hardship a family endures when a loved one succumbs to mental illness. There is much we can do to help Michigan residents, including Veterans, have access to quality and affordable mental health services, promote understanding of mental illness, and remove the stigma often related to it.

The Michigan economy suffered great losses in the 2008-2009 recession. Many large businesses received government bailouts, but numerous small businesses were allowed to fail, including mine. The bank foreclosed on my business and home. In 2010, my family packed our personal belongings and returned to Ann Arbor. I rented a home, purchased the assets of a closed lab, and restarted my business. In six years, the business grew to $11 million in revenues, creating 50 highly-paying jobs. In 2016, for the third time, I was chosen as “Entrepreneur of the Year” by Ernst and Young. Shortly thereafter, I sold majority ownership in my business and decided to devote the rest of my life to public service. As many of you may remember, I ran in the Democratic Primary for Governor. I did not win the primary in the state at-large, but did win in the city of Detroit. During my gubernatorial campaign, I was fortunate to spend a great deal of time in Detroit, where I received more love and affection than I have experienced anywhere else during my 40 years of living in America. However, in certain parts of Detroit I found living conditions to be worse than those in the developing world — homes with no running water, and schools with no supplies or heat should never be found in our city. But in the warmth of the people, I found my true home in Detroit.

It is here in the city of Detroit where I found my calling to public service. Systemic racism; social, economic, and environmental injustices; lack of quality education; and suffering associated with generations of poverty have forged my resolve to pursue, through an elected office, a platform where I may be most effective in bettering the lives of the people in our city. I am running to be your next State Representative with the goal to improve our quality of life. I am dedicated to vastly improving education and healthcare, and bringing progressive values, opportunity, and entrepreneurship to Detroit. With great hopes for the future of our city, I ask for your vote on August 4, 2020, so together we can make life
better for all Detroiters.

In Solidarity,

Shri Thanedar, PhD | Candidate, State Representative, District 3

BY: Shri Thanedar, Candidate For State Rep

I was 14 years old when my father lost his job, causing my large family to fall into financial hardship. Like many Detroiters, I understand the pain of poverty firsthand. My family struggled to make ends meet, so I worked at night as a janitor while in high school, and we received help from public assistance programs. I continued to work my way through college, completing both a Bachelor and Master of Science Degrees in Chemistry. With these credentials, I was able to obtain a better job to lift up my family financially, paying for my sisters’ weddings and brother’s education. I later continued my education, earning a PhD in Chemistry from the University of Akron in Ohio, a Master of Business Administration from Fontbonne College in Missouri, and post-doctoral education at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. My education helped to set my career in motion. It was education that helped me overcome poverty, which is why I believe so strongly that we must greatly improve our children’s educational opportunities. It is imperative that we designate need-based funding for each child regardless of zip code to ensure that every child attains her or his full potential. Educational programs must start during early childhood. When education begins earlier, we know that outcomes improve. Even before kindergarten, young children have a tremendous capacity to absorb knowledge. We must develop pre-school programs to nurture their abilities. One of my priorities is to provide affordable childcare and pre-school education to every child. I am appalled when I learn about dismal conditions in some Detroit schools: forty or more students in a classroom; rain water on gymnasium floors; teachers paying for supplies from their own pockets; no art or music classes; no science or chemistry labs; teachers and students afraid for their safety; and kids wearing winter jackets in the classroom for lack of adequate heating. This is completely unacceptable. We must fix our failing school infrastructure, hire the support staff our teachers need, and pay teachers far better to foster opportunities in our communities. I am committed to increasing the staff of guidance counselors, social workers and psychologists in Detroit schools. These professionals help to identify students’ needs and provide essential services to help them succeed. In 2018, the Detroit Free Press reported, “In Michigan, on average, one counselor is assigned to as many as 732 students. That’s the third-
highest counselor-to-student ratio in the country.” Michigan is one of the 15 states without laws limiting class size, another fact I want to change.

I have had the privilege of creating job opportunities when I ran my small businesses and I hope to bring that spirit to Detroit. In 1990, I bought a three- person laboratory. By 2008, the business had grown under my leadership to 450 highly- paid employees, including 65 PhD chemists. My accomplishments were honored when I was named the Ernst and Young “Entrepreneur of the Year” in 1999 and again in 2007. As my business grew, I developed a passion for fostering entrepreneurship and small business ownership using micro-loans, business education, and business incubators — tools that have the power to revive communities that are neglected, underfunded, and struggling. I will use my experience to spur economic growth and innovation, and improve Detroit’s small businesses. While my business life thrived, my personal life did not. In 1996, when my sons were four and eight years old, they lost their mother to death related to mental illness. For four years, I struggled as a single, grieving father, until I was blessed to meet Shashi and marry this wonderful woman who helped raise the boys and heal our family. For many years, I experienced firsthand the suffering and hardship a family endures when a loved one succumbs to mental illness. There is much we can do to help Michigan residents, including Veterans, have access to quality and affordable mental health services, promote understanding of mental illness, and remove the stigma often related to it.

The Michigan economy suffered great losses in the 2008-2009 recession. Many large businesses received government bailouts, but numerous small businesses were allowed to fail, including mine. The bank foreclosed on my business and home. In 2010, my family packed our personal belongings and returned to Ann Arbor. I rented a home, purchased the assets of a closed lab, and restarted my business. In six years, the business grew to $11 million in revenues, creating 50 highly-paying jobs. In 2016, for the third time, I was chosen as “Entrepreneur of the Year” by Ernst and Young. Shortly thereafter, I sold majority ownership in my business and decided to devote the rest of my life to public service. As many of you may remember, I ran in the Democratic Primary for Governor. I did not win the primary in the state at-large, but did win in the city of Detroit. During my gubernatorial campaign, I was fortunate to spend a great deal of time in Detroit, where I received more love and affection than I have experienced anywhere else during my 40 years of living in America. However, in certain parts of Detroit I found living conditions to be worse than those in the developing world — homes with no running water, and schools with no supplies or heat should never be found in our city. But in the warmth of the people, I found my true home in Detroit.

It is here in the city of Detroit where I found my calling to public service. Systemic racism; social, economic, and environmental injustices; lack of quality education; and suffering associated with generations of poverty have forged my resolve to pursue, through an elected office, a platform where I may be most effective in bettering the lives of the people in our city. I am running to be your next State Representative with the goal to improve our quality of life. I am dedicated to vastly improving education and healthcare, and bringing progressive values, opportunity, and entrepreneurship to Detroit. With great hopes for the future of our city, I ask for your vote on August 4, 2020, so together we can make life
better for all Detroiters.

In Solidarity,

Shri Thanedar, PhD | Candidate, State Representative, District 3

shri thanedar

SHRI THANEDAR FOR STATE REP

Use Your Power. Join Our Movement.

SHRI THANEDAR FOR STATE REP

Use Your Power. Join Our Movement.