Police Brutality

SHRI THANEDAR MAKES STATEMENT ON DEATH OF GEORGE FLOYD & CALLS FOR PEACE, UNITY & NEW JUSTICE INITIATIVES TO END LETHAL FORCE IN MI

Damon Grimes. Eric Garner. Sandra Bland. Jamar Clark. Philando Castile. Michael Brown. Ahmaud Arbery. Uwimana Gasito. Milton Hall. Sha’Teina Grady El, Breonna Taylor. George Floyd. . .

These are the names of just some of the many victims of police brutality in Michigan and across America. George Floyd, who suffered at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer, who had taken an oath to protect and serve, committed an act of lethal force that should not have happened under any circumstance. George Floyd and every person named above was subjected to police misconduct and should still be alive, without injuries or free, today.

Brutality against Black people by the police has plagued America since the formation of the first police department in New York City in 1844. Violence against Black people has become an unjust “norm” in American society dating back to the days of this
county’s “Original Sin” of slavery and it is time for real change. Technology has now aided in capturing the images of excessive force, exposing these
inhumane practices to the world. And, now it is time to stop injuries, baseless arrests and reprehensible killings in violation of the U.S. Constitution and the civil rights of Black people in America.

We can overcome improper police conduct by implementing new Justice Policy Initiatives to pre-emptively STOP these inhumane incidents from ever happening. I ask for peace, calm and unity during protest activities and remind everyone to wear PPE and practice social distancing amid this pandemic so that we can ultimately claim victory over the battle against police brutality and COVID-19. In peace and solidarity,

Shri’s Justice Policy Initiative Proposal to End Lethal Force

To protect human life, legislation must be proposed to create real accountability and implement uniform best practices across the state of Michigan to organize regular and ongoing in-service training to sensitize police to the importance of good race and ethnic relations and fair, non-discriminatory law enforcement.

· Develop a race-relations plan of action, in consultation with various ethnic
communities and leaders within such communities.
· Issue clear orders on appropriate comportment, demeanor, language and
attitudes vis-à-vis various ethnic and racial groups.
· Evaluate recruitment, hiring and promotion policies, to ensure fairness among
various demographic groups.
· Actively recruit members of ethnic and racial minorities, and of groups under-
represented in Michigan police service and law enforcement agencies.
· Establish mechanisms to receive, continuously, the complaints and suggestions
of members of ethnic, racial, religious and linguistic groups in the community.
· Adopt effective community policing strategies.
· Appoint a “Minority-Relations Director and/or Manager” within police agencies.
· Punish discriminatory, insensitive or otherwise inappropriate professional
behavior and police misconduct.
· Reward officer initiatives supportive of better police-community relations.
· Provide in-service training in ethnic/race relations for all police officials and
offer metrics to provide benchmarks and measure outcomes.

Police Violations of Human Rights

Human Rights Standards

Application of General Human Rights Principles Human Rights Standards International human rights law is binding on all States and their agents, including law enforcement officials. Human Rights is a legitimate subject for international law and international scrutiny. Law enforcement officials are obliged to know, and to apply, international standards for human rights.

Human Rights Practice

· Adopt a comprehensive human rights policy for Michigan law enforcement agencies.
· Incorporate human rights standards into standing orders for Michigan police agencies.
· Provide human rights training to all police, at recruitment and periodically.
· Cooperate with national and international human rights organizations.

Ethical and Legal Conduct Human Rights

Standards of Human Tights derive from the inherent dignity of the human person Law enforcement officials shall at all times respect and obey the law. Law enforcement officials shall at all times fulfill the duty imposed on them by law, by serving the community and by protecting all persons.

Policy Initiatives to Uphold Human Rights

Law enforcement officials shall respect and protect human dignity, and shall maintain and uphold the human rights of all persons Law enforcement agencies shall be accountable to the community as a whole.

Effective mechanisms shall be established to ensure internal discipline and external control as well as the effective supervision of law enforcement officials Law enforcement officials who have reason to believe that a violation has occurred, or is about to occur, shall report the matter.

Provisions shall be made for the receipt and processing of complaints against law enforcement officials made by members of the public, and the existence of those provisions shall be publicized Investigations of violations shall be prompt, competent, thorough and impartial
Investigations shall seek to identify victims; recover and preserve evidence; discover witnesses; discover cause, manner, location and time of the violation; and identify and apprehend perpetrators.

Crime scenes shall be carefully processed Superior Officers/Incident Commanders shall be held responsible for all abuses if they knew, or should have known, of their occurrence, and did not take action.

Police are to receive immunity from prosecution or discipline for refusing unlawful superior orders.

Obedience to superior orders shall not be a defense for violations committed by police.

Source: https://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Publications/training5Add3en.pdf ; OFFICE OF THE UNITED NATIONS HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR HUMAN RIGHTS

Proposed Righteousness in Arrest Act (Based on an EU model)

Process of Arrest

Herein is a simple system that police can use in order to properly process a reported crime; this is called the Three Point Process. This starts with arrival on the scene and goes as follows:

1. Warn those present that you are a lawfully appointed police office/trooper.
2. Give your rank and surname to those nearby.
3. Instruct those present to remain still with their hands where you or one of your colleagues can see them.
4. Instruct those present to lay down any weapons that may be drawn.
5. Establish the facts of the situation.
6. Detain those suspected of a crime (for very minor crimes or public disturbances a warning may suffice instead of arrest.)
7. Swiftly return the detained suspect(s) to the station or post for processing.
8. Log the arrest and write a report, then hand them over to an appropriate Officer. Take the names of all witnesses and suspects.
9. If no Officer is present detain the suspect in the cells until one can arrive.

The reason this is called the Three Point System is that if at any stage you are inhibited or otherwise prevented from carrying out one of the stages you count off one point. Once three points have been counted off it is appropriate to draw a weapon and use force to carry out the arrest. HOWEVER the weapon used should be non-lethal in nature UNLESS there is a very real threat of serious harm to yourself, your colleagues, or the public.

Immediate Use of Force

There will be circumstances in the commission of police duties when it will be necessary to skip the Three Point Process and immediately use force. These circumstances are listed below:

1. When significant violence is taking place.
2. When the suspect(s) are armed and refuse lay down their weapons.

3. When you or another officer/trooper sees a suspect use their weapon in the commission of their crime.
4. When you or another guard are physically attacked.
5. When a suspect or person of interest draws their weapon in your presence without permission.
6. When there is an immediate and significant threat to the safety of the public.

Use of Lethal Force

Lethal Force is a term used to describe when force used results in serious harm; basically when the use of force results in GBH, Wounding or Death. Generally speaking you as an Officer or State Trooper are not allowed to use Lethal Force; however there are some circumstances when it may be necessary. Below is a list of circumstances that warrant the use of lethal force:

1. Lethal force has been used by the suspect.
2. There is a clear and immediate threat of the use of lethal force by the suspect.
3. When you or another officer are physically attacked.
4. When a suspect who has been arrested and/or detained in the cells attempts to escape.
5. When a convicted criminal attempts to escape imprisonment.
6. When the actions of a suspect or person of interest put your life at risk.

SHRI THANEDAR MAKES STATEMENT ON DEATH OF GEORGE FLOYD & CALLS FOR PEACE, UNITY & NEW JUSTICE INITIATIVES TO END LETHAL FORCE IN MI

Damon Grimes. Eric Garner. Sandra Bland. Jamar Clark. Philando Castile. Michael Brown. Ahmaud Arbery. Uwimana Gasito. Milton Hall. Sha’Teina Grady El, Breonna Taylor. George Floyd. . .

These are the names of just some of the many victims of police brutality in Michigan and across America. George Floyd, who suffered at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer, who had taken an oath to protect and serve, committed an act of lethal force that should not have happened under any circumstance. George Floyd and every person named above was subjected to police misconduct and should still be alive, without injuries or free, today.

Brutality against Black people by the police has plagued America since the formation of the first police department in New York City in 1844. Violence against Black people has become an unjust “norm” in American society dating back to the days of this
county’s “Original Sin” of slavery and it is time for real change. Technology has now aided in capturing the images of excessive force, exposing these
inhumane practices to the world. And, now it is time to stop injuries, baseless arrests and reprehensible killings in violation of the U.S. Constitution and the civil rights of Black people in America.

We can overcome improper police conduct by implementing new Justice Policy Initiatives to pre-emptively STOP these inhumane incidents from ever happening. I ask for peace, calm and unity during protest activities and remind everyone to wear PPE and practice social distancing amid this pandemic so that we can ultimately claim victory over the battle against police brutality and COVID-19. In peace and solidarity,

Shri’s Justice Policy Initiative Proposal to End Lethal Force

To protect human life, legislation must be proposed to create real accountability and implement uniform best practices across the state of Michigan to organize regular and ongoing in-service training to sensitize police to the importance of good race and ethnic relations and fair, non-discriminatory law enforcement.

· Develop a race-relations plan of action, in consultation with various ethnic
communities and leaders within such communities.
· Issue clear orders on appropriate comportment, demeanor, language and
attitudes vis-à-vis various ethnic and racial groups.
· Evaluate recruitment, hiring and promotion policies, to ensure fairness among
various demographic groups.
· Actively recruit members of ethnic and racial minorities, and of groups under-
represented in Michigan police service and law enforcement agencies.
· Establish mechanisms to receive, continuously, the complaints and suggestions
of members of ethnic, racial, religious and linguistic groups in the community.
· Adopt effective community policing strategies.
· Appoint a “Minority-Relations Director and/or Manager” within police agencies.
· Punish discriminatory, insensitive or otherwise inappropriate professional
behavior and police misconduct.
· Reward officer initiatives supportive of better police-community relations.
· Provide in-service training in ethnic/race relations for all police officials and
offer metrics to provide benchmarks and measure outcomes.

Police Violations of Human Rights

Human Rights Standards

Application of General Human Rights Principles Human Rights Standards International human rights law is binding on all States and their agents, including law enforcement officials. Human Rights is a legitimate subject for international law and international scrutiny. Law enforcement officials are obliged to know, and to apply, international standards for human rights.

Human Rights Practice

· Adopt a comprehensive human rights policy for Michigan law enforcement agencies.
· Incorporate human rights standards into standing orders for Michigan police agencies.
· Provide human rights training to all police, at recruitment and periodically.
· Cooperate with national and international human rights organizations.

Ethical and Legal Conduct Human Rights

Standards of Human Tights derive from the inherent dignity of the human person Law enforcement officials shall at all times respect and obey the law. Law enforcement officials shall at all times fulfill the duty imposed on them by law, by serving the community and by protecting all persons.

Policy Initiatives to Uphold Human Rights

Law enforcement officials shall respect and protect human dignity, and shall maintain and uphold the human rights of all persons Law enforcement agencies shall be accountable to the community as a whole.

Effective mechanisms shall be established to ensure internal discipline and external control as well as the effective supervision of law enforcement officials Law enforcement officials who have reason to believe that a violation has occurred, or is about to occur, shall report the matter.

Provisions shall be made for the receipt and processing of complaints against law enforcement officials made by members of the public, and the existence of those provisions shall be publicized Investigations of violations shall be prompt, competent, thorough and impartial
Investigations shall seek to identify victims; recover and preserve evidence; discover witnesses; discover cause, manner, location and time of the violation; and identify and apprehend perpetrators.

Crime scenes shall be carefully processed Superior Officers/Incident Commanders shall be held responsible for all abuses if they knew, or should have known, of their occurrence, and did not take action.

Police are to receive immunity from prosecution or discipline for refusing unlawful superior orders.

Obedience to superior orders shall not be a defense for violations committed by police.

Source: https://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Publications/training5Add3en.pdf ; OFFICE OF THE UNITED NATIONS HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR HUMAN RIGHTS

Proposed Righteousness in Arrest Act (Based on an EU model)

Process of Arrest

Herein is a simple system that police can use in order to properly process a reported crime; this is called the Three Point Process. This starts with arrival on the scene and goes as follows:

1. Warn those present that you are a lawfully appointed police office/trooper.
2. Give your rank and surname to those nearby.
3. Instruct those present to remain still with their hands where you or one of your colleagues can see them.
4. Instruct those present to lay down any weapons that may be drawn.
5. Establish the facts of the situation.
6. Detain those suspected of a crime (for very minor crimes or public disturbances a warning may suffice instead of arrest.)
7. Swiftly return the detained suspect(s) to the station or post for processing.
8. Log the arrest and write a report, then hand them over to an appropriate Officer. Take the names of all witnesses and suspects.
9. If no Officer is present detain the suspect in the cells until one can arrive.

The reason this is called the Three Point System is that if at any stage you are inhibited or otherwise prevented from carrying out one of the stages you count off one point. Once three points have been counted off it is appropriate to draw a weapon and use force to carry out the arrest. HOWEVER the weapon used should be non-lethal in nature UNLESS there is a very real threat of serious harm to yourself, your colleagues, or the public.

Immediate Use of Force

There will be circumstances in the commission of police duties when it will be necessary to skip the Three Point Process and immediately use force. These circumstances are listed below:

1. When significant violence is taking place.
2. When the suspect(s) are armed and refuse lay down their weapons.

3. When you or another officer/trooper sees a suspect use their weapon in the commission of their crime.
4. When you or another guard are physically attacked.
5. When a suspect or person of interest draws their weapon in your presence without permission.
6. When there is an immediate and significant threat to the safety of the public.

Use of Lethal Force

Lethal Force is a term used to describe when force used results in serious harm; basically when the use of force results in GBH, Wounding or Death. Generally speaking you as an Officer or State Trooper are not allowed to use Lethal Force; however there are some circumstances when it may be necessary. Below is a list of circumstances that warrant the use of lethal force:

1. Lethal force has been used by the suspect.
2. There is a clear and immediate threat of the use of lethal force by the suspect.
3. When you or another officer are physically attacked.
4. When a suspect who has been arrested and/or detained in the cells attempts to escape.
5. When a convicted criminal attempts to escape imprisonment.
6. When the actions of a suspect or person of interest put your life at risk.

shri thanedar

SHRI THANEDAR FOR STATE REP

Use Your Power. Join Our Movement.

SHRI THANEDAR FOR STATE REP

Use Your Power. Join Our Movement.